Recognising when children and young people display sexually harmful behaviour

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8 November

Thackray Medical Musuem, Leeds
PRICE

Speakers

Start

November 8, 2017 - 10:00 am

End

November 8, 2017 - 3:30 pm

Address

Thackray Medical Museum, 141 Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7LN   View map





Background

It is estimated that between 30 and 40% of sexual abuse against children and young people is perpetrated by someone under 18. Usually the perpetrator is male, but the number of girls displaying sexually harmful behaviour appears to be growing. In addition, use of the internet and social media has increased the volume and types of sexual behaviours.

Opportunities for intervention may be missed because mainstream professionals are unsure of what to look for and are reluctant to refer a child or young person for assessment of sexually harmful behaviour. Reports into inappropriate sexual behaviour by children and young people have highlighted the delayed response to early incidents. The Criminal Justice Joint Inspection (February 2013) also criticised the side-lining of key services, especially schools, despite the fact that schools are “a rich source of information” about children.

Research suggests that this group respond well to interventions. This year’s ‘Now I know it was wrong: Report of the parliamentary inquiry into support and sanctions for children who display harmful sexual behaviour’ noted thatchildren make mistakes as they start to understand their sexuality and experiment with it. These children are unlikely to pose further risk to the public, given appropriate support, but unnecessarily criminalising or stigmatising them as a ‘sex offender’ at such a young age makes it more likely that they will struggle to regain a normal life.”

Sexually harmful behaviour has been correlated with a number of factors including parental neglect, a range of learning difficulties and disabilities, and being the victim of sexual abuse. While only a minority of those who have experienced abuse will go on to do the same to others, the potential for this cycle of behaviour and its intergenerational risks are another reason for early recognition and assessment.

In 2013 the NSPCC estimated that the number of sex offences committed by under-18s has risen by almost 40% in the three years since 2009/10. Much of this rise was attributed to the impact of sexually explicit material which is easily accessed on-line, and then shared.

Professionals who work with children and young people need guidance on what to look for, how to make an assessment where real concerns exist, and what to do next. There are important differences, for example, between under 11s and 12-18 year olds.

This learning day aims to provide mainstream professionals who work with children and young people with an accurate understanding of the nature and incidence of sexually harmful behaviour, differences between age groups, how to recognise signs of sexually harmful behaviour, how to make an initial assessment, and how to respond appropriately.

This learning day was run on 23 March this year and 100% of the feedback rated the day excellent or good.

Participant comments includes:

“An excellent, informative day – thank you”

“Really engaging delivery”

“…offers a new perspective on sexually harmful behaviour in children”

“a much needed highlight of behaviours professionals need to recognise”

This learning day is facilitated by Vince Mercer from the AIM Project, which trains and advises a range of agencies on sexually harmful behaviour.

 The day is suitable for professionals who need an introduction to the nature and issues around sexually harmful behaviour by children and young people.

 The sessions aim to provide mainstream professionals who work with children and young people with an accurate understanding of the nature and incidence of sexually harmful behaviour, differences between age groups, how to recognise signs of sexually harmful behaviour, how to make an initial assessment, and how to respond appropriately.

 Sessions will include:

  • A definition of sexually harmful behaviour – what do we mean? How do we distinguish from children’s sexual curiosity?
  • The opportunity to reflect on personal and professional responses to this group
  • Available evidence on younger children who display sexually harmful behaviour (11 and under)
  • Available evidence on young people who display sexually harmful behaviour (12 – 18)
  • The above two sessions will include influencing factors, differences between girls and boys, the inter-generational aspects of behaviour, and how to respond to concerns about a child or young person
  • The importance of working with parents and families, and of sharing information with other agencies
  • Tools which can help with early identification, assessment and managing the process
  • Plenty of opportunities for questions and contributions

Agenda (subject to change)

9.30 – 10.00

Registration and coffee

10.00 – 10.05

Welcome and introduction

10.05 – 10.40

‘They are all at it’ – A Continuum Exercise

10.40 – 11.10

What do we know about children under 12 years who display harmful sexual behaviour?

11.10 – 11.30

Coffee

11.30 – 11.45

Developmental stages

11.45 – 12.40

What do we know about adolescents who display harmful sexual behaviour?

12.40 – 1.40

Lunch

1.40 – 2.15

The importance and possibilities of working with families

2.15 – 2.30

Quick break

2.30 – 3.30

Initial assessment tools

3.30

Final questions and end of learning day

The day is suitable for professionals who need an introduction to the nature and issues around sexually harmful behaviour by children and young people.

 

  • Children’s social services
  • Services supporting young people
  • Children’s charities
  • Local Safeguarding Children Boards
  • Police
  • Youth Offending Services
  • Schools – teachers, teaching assistants, pastoral care staff, school nurses
  • Parent support services
  • Family support services
  • Community health services
  • CAMHS and other mental health services for children and young people
  • Domestic and sexual violence services
  • Organisations which support young victims of abuse and their families
  • Drug and alcohol services

 

 

Delegate fee:

 £130 + VAT = £156

Team of 3 (3rd person attends for half price) £325 + VAT = £390

Team of 5 (5th person attends for free) £520 + VAT = £624

ring 0115 916 3104 for details.

 

Included in the delegate package:

  • Delegate pack
  • Lunch
  • Refreshments available throughout the day

 

Booking Terms and Conditions

Cancellations received up to and including 18th October 2017 will be refunded in full less an administration fee of 25%. Cancellations received after this date will be liable for payment in full.

Team bookings are non-cancellable but substitute delegates will always be accepted.

The full invoice amount will remain payable if you fail to attend the event, however, substitute delegates will be accepted up until, and including, the day of the event.

CANCELLATIONS SHOULD BE MADE IN WRITING TO conferences@ccclimited.org.uk AND WILL BE ACKNOWLEDGED BY RETURN.

 

Confirmation of booking:

Your booking will be confirmed by email where possible (and by fax or post otherwise), and you will be provided with directions to the venue and details on nearby hotel accommodation. If you do not receive such acknowledgement, please contact Central Conference Consultants Ltd on 0115 916 3104.

The learning day will take place in Leeds:

The full address is:

Thackray Medical Museum
141 Beckett Street
Leeds
LS9 7LN

 T: 0113 205 6525

W: http://www.thackraymedicalmuseum.co.uk/

The Thackray Medical Museum is next to St James’s Hospital in Leeds, two miles from the city centre and easily reached by road and public transport.

Map and directions can also be found at this link: http://www.thackraymedicalmuseum.co.uk/visit/plan-your-visit/how-to-get-here/

Public Transport

It is approximately 10 minute taxi ride from Leeds Rail Station

Frequent bus services run from Leeds city centre. Numbers 16, 42, 49, 50, and 50A all stop nearby.

Travel by car

If travelling by road via the M621, follow the signs for York (A64) then follow the brown tourist signs.

From the north, take the A58 towards Leeds, and then follow the brown tourist signs.
Parking

There is an onsite Pay and Display car park for Museum visitors as well as conference delegates, which has room for 120 cars. The spaces are available on a first come first served basis. Please have the correct change as the machines do not give change and they do not take notes. Alternatively you can pay using your mobile phone & card (admin charge applies) details on the machines. Anyone attending a full day conference/event pays just £4. Please pay as normal at the machine and obtain an extension permit from the car park attendant to display in your vehicle.

There are four parking spaces for Blue Badge holders, which are also allocated on a first come first served basis and are free of charge.

Alternative parking is available at St James’s Hospital multi-storey car park on Beckett Street (5mins walk). In addition, there are also two pay and display car parks within a few minutes walk. However, these car parks have their own charges and hourly rates as they are not associated with the Museum.

Accommodation

Details of nearby hotels will be sent out with confirmation of booking information.

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